Sheffield Drop Offs – Part 3

As you probably know by now I spent last week in Sheffield, mainly to work on my writing, but also with the aim to drop off a couple of bottles.

I wrote about my preparation in a first part here. There I showed you the four bottles I prepared, the four bottles that Peter sent me to dispatch for him, and I also mentioned that I packed two empty bottles for possible by-standers to fill.

In the second part I spoke about arriving in Sheffield and discovering that the Don where I put my bottles is full of little islands, had little water and current and in addition a lot of weirs. I dropped in both bottles nonetheless, and was able to observe Peter’s bottle getting stuck pretty much immediately, so probably now you want to know what happened next with it.

Peter’s Bottle No. 100

On the top of the blog you can see how I left Peter’s No. 100 behind on Tuesday the 9th. The place was just a 10 minute walk from my hotel, so the plan was of course to check the next day whether it was still there.

I was extremely lucky with the weather: The 10th was sunny and warm and felt more like a September than like an October day. When I came to the place at around noon, I was first pleased to see that the bottle was gone and apparently had moved on:

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Nothing to see – Yay!

The whole board against which the bottle was resting moved a few meters along the river (I think that old christmas tree in there remained stationary, so you can compare with that), and in the process it obviously gave the bottle free.
I continued to walk along the river (I had more bottles to dispatch after all, but more about that later) and spotted the bottle again, only 20 or 30m further downstream.

I believe you can click on the images to see them in enlarged (I hope so), in the second image I placed arrows where the bottle got stuck on the first and the second day. Of course I had to check again on my way back. The bottle had made a few more meters further downstream where it rested again with some other junk but still above the foot bridge located there.

The forecast for the next day (11th) predicted a day with showers moving through. I woke up to skies that looked somewhat threatening, and so I started early while it was still dry. The wind was blowing in gusts, but no rain. I first walked to the spot I last saw Peter’s bottle. It had moved again a couple of meters. I could see it moving very slowly, and then getting stuck once more between some floating grass and other plant material.
In the photo below just a little upstream of this cut through in the wall, that’s where I last spotted it. (The photo was taken a day earlier for the stone under the bridge, but that’s a story of its own. Anyway, that’s why the bottle can’t be seen in the photo.)

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As I said, that was the last time I saw it. I went to look for it again the same day, just a couple of hours later, and I was unable to see it anywhere. Which is somewhat of a mystery to me: Given the slow manner with which it was moving I can’t understand how it could have disappeared out of sight in just a few hours. The river downstream from there looked like it had fewer hurdles, but still, it was moving at no more than half a meter per second so how far could it go? It was floating on the right hand bank which has a tall wall as its border… But who knows, maybe someone has found it already. – I hope we’ll hear from it again.

 Other drop ins

This blog post is again getting very long, and I’ll try to cut me short. As mentioned before, the weather on the 10th was wonderful, and I walked slowly down the Don, putting in two bottles from the spider bridge,  visible in the photo above if you know what to look out for, and then I sat down and filled one of the empty bottles I brought with me. I had not arranged any meet-up, no-one I saw on my hike seemed interested, and so I just ripped a few pages from my notebook and filled them with a message on the spot. I didn’t give this bottle a number, as I don’t really regard it as part of this project. Well, maybe a little.
Below are photos taken on the 10th. If you click on them, you’ll be able to read some further comments on them if you like.

The next day, the 11th, I went out in the morning to first look for Peter’s bottle and while doing so, I spotted the entrance to Victoria Quays. So I decided to take a walk along the canal for a change. Because I had already spent the better of the day before hiking along the river I cut my visit relatively short and dropped my bottle just behind the entrance to the Quays. I wasn’t sure how Peter would feel about his bottle being put in a non-flowing body of water, and besides: it smelled awfully beneath the bridge where I placed it. For a bottle containing miniature kidney bowls seemed fitting but  beautiful bottle like Peter’s? – That felt just wrong. And so I held on to that one for a while longer.

The weather stayed surprisingly nice and dry that day, and for unknown reasons I struggled to get any good work done sitting in my hotel room. And so I decided to walk to the Don once more in the afternoon. I probably should have walked upstream for a change. But I was too curious to see whether and which of the dropped off bottles I might spot. Because I didn’t feel like dropping a bottle from a bridge where I already had been, I walked further than before, right into a nature reserve that made it almost feel like I had left the city. There I dropped then my last bottle, the No. 103 into the Don, and Peter’s 102.

On my walk to there I spotted two of my bottles: the unnumbered one above the weir at Norfolk bridge where I dropped it in, and one of my small bottles below the weir. I am not sure which of the two it was as the sun was reflecting so much that it was hard to see what was inside, but looking at the photos now, I am pretty sure it was the 102 that I put in from spider bridge the day before.

While walking along the river, the canal and through the city I made many more pictures with little and big things I spotted, street art and loving little details, imagining showing them to you. But my report is taking way too much time and space already, and I don’t want to bore anyone. Many thanks for your interest, dear reader, who has read until here. I’ll just let that guy below that I spotted on one of my excursion wave you good bye.

Like always, I wish all my bottles a good and far travel and happy finders.  – Next up will be the dispatch of Peter’s bottle No. 103 from Trent Bridge in West Bridgeford. Stay Tuned!

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Sheffield: Part 2 – Day 1, Twice the No. 100

From 9th – 12th October I spent a couple of days in Sheffield. They were my personal writer’s retreat: I booked myself into a hotel and spent my days there to write. BUT of course I carried a couple of bottles to dispatch, too. I had a really good time, with walks along the river and canal, discovering little and big things on my excursions, with new ideas and trying marmite for the first time – and got a lot of writing done.

Unfortunately because I was writing anyway, I failed to write here on this blog while things were happening, which I now realise was a mistake: Packing everything I want to tell and show you into one big blogpost is just too much. So I decided to split it into three (or maybe it will turn out four) parts. You can find the first part here, in which I show you a bit behind the scenes bottle making.

Here’s a map of the dispatches, as some kind of preview for those who are just too curious just now (and also in case a bottle is being found already). You’ll notice that there are three kinds of markers in there: the blue ones are where I dropped off my bottles, the red ones are sightings, and the green ones are where I dropped off Peter’s bottles.

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Lady’s Bridge in Sheffield

Day 1 – Upper Don Walk

I arrived in Sheffield later than expected on Tuesday, due to a derailed train at Sheffield train station. I had planned to first visit the river and then check in, but now I decided to first go to the hotel. Which turned out to be a good decision since Sheffield is much more hilly than expected, and with that I mean steap streets, steep, – mountaineous! Well, maybe it wasn’t quite as bad, but the constant sloping makes walking with a pull along suitcase full of books and paper (I was there to write after all) a bit of a hassle. Wikipedia agrees that my feeling that Sheffield is exceptionally steep is justified:

Sheffield is a geographically diverse city. The city nestles in the eastern foothills of the Pennines, and a natural amphitheatre created by several hills and the confluence of five rivers: Don, Sheaf, Rivelin, Loxley and Porter. As such, much of the city is built on hillsides with views into the city centre or out to the countryside. Blake Street, in the S6 postcode area, is the third steepest residential street in England, with a gradient of 16.6°. The city’s lowest point is just 29 metres (95 ft) above sea level near Blackburn Meadows, while some parts of the city are at over 500 metres (1,640 ft); the highest point being 548 metres (1,798 ft) at High Stones, near Margery Hill. However, 79% of the housing in the city is between 100 and 200 metres (330 and 660 ft) above sea level.

Well, I arrived on a lovely sunny and warm autumn day, and right after checking in to my hotel, I packed my backpack with some bottles, and started to walk to find the river Don. When I came closer to Lady’s Bridge (the oldest bridge in Sheffield), I discovered this:

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Well, if that’s not inviting, then I don’t know what is. I went through the arch and immediately reached the Don:

sheffield day 1-1

When you look in the photo with the arch above, you’ll see that the path through the arch brought me onto a foot path along the river. From the entrance it looks like you could walk up or downstream, however the downstream path was blocked by a building next to Lady’s Bridge. The photo right above here shows the view looking left, upstream, onto the bridge from where I would shortly after dispatch my first bottle in Sheffield. Looking to the right revealed the sight of the Lady’s Bridge as you can see it in the photo further above.

I followed the path upstream and crossed the next bridge, the foot bridge you can see in the photo above, and then the walk continued on the other bank. Without much hesitation I decided to throw in my first botte, the 100th message in a bottle in this project:

dispatch no 100 kleiner

The view from the bridge, a last look at the bottle, and then the farewell

My bottle drew the attention of some ducks which, although they seemed disappointed that the object that had fallen from the bridge didn’t seem edible, swam around and with it. Lazily the bottle bobbed in the water and moved very slowly. It was easy to cross the bridge, and then follow it on the Upper Don Walk until I reached came closer to the Lady’s Bridge and had to walk around a building which meant I briefly lost sight of the bottle. Up on the bridge I expected to see it again. I wanted to check whether it made it down the weir. But the glaring sun and its many reflections on the water made it hard to spot the little bottle. I have a series of photos which I shot in the believe they had the bottle on it. But upon close inspection on my computer, it looks just like waves and leaves and stones.

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Upstream view of the Don from Lady’s Bridge in Sheffield

I mentioned before, that I was carrying not only my 4 bottles to Nottingham, but also Peter‘s. And as fate would have it, his bottles carry the same serial numbers as mine did. So I had another No. 100 in my backpack that wanted to be set free.
According to his blogpost he had read up on the river Don and knew to expect weirs. I was blissfully unaware of them until I saw them. I had dropped in mine without hesitation, but seeing its slow trundle along the lazy river, and also because it was rather big, I figured I’d rather drop it in from lady’s bridge, below the weir.

But, upon crossing the street and looking down the bridge, I had to realise that there was a little island just behind the bridge, blocking the free flow of the river.

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Lady’s Bridge from below the weir

I later learned, that these islands in the Don are due to the weirs. The rushing water washes up sediment, and with the water quality rising in the river, they are home to wildlife and are cherished and cared for.

Just downstream of Lady’s Bridge, the Upper Don Walk ends, and the Five Weir Walk starts. Ah, well, so there were more weirs to be expected.
From where I stood I could see the next bridge, and hoped to find a better place there to dispatch Peter’s centennial bottle. No such luck: Another island was waiting for it there. By that time, however, I was beginning to feel eager to return to me “real” work, and figured, I’d have more time tomorrow to explore more of the river, and after all, I had six more bottles to dispatch. So in it went. I took great care to find the best spot where the bottle would hopefully avoid the island. I watched it float downstream, happy that I seemed to have chosen well:

peters 100 kleiner

It went swiftly past the island, but then floated toward the right – and got stuck on a piece of driftwood. I watched it struggle for a while. The current and gusts of strong wind seemed to help it move on – almost. After a couple of minutes I gave up for the day, determined to come back the next day.

 

Four splashes in Skegness

Skegness Beach, trying to find a spot and moment where I wasn’t watched putting the bottles in

First of June is the birthday of my twins (who are at the beginning of the story of this whole project), and we went to Skegess with them for this weekend to celebrate their big day. Of course I also brought some bottles with me. Now, when you put a bottle into the sea from the shore, chances are it will return to the same shore (most likely the same beach) from where you put it in. But this was the only thing I could do this weekend, and some of the bottles have waited for a dispatch since October, so I figured, I’d just take my chances. And after all, if they get found soon, that also has its advantages: It is likely that the contents are undamaged, and they’ll hopefully make their finders happy, no matter how long they travelled.

Bottles No. 93 and No. 96 shortly before their dispatch at Skegness Central Beach at 2/6/2018

We reached Skegness central beach on Saturday 2/6 at about 4pm. It was a couple of minutes to low tide, and thus an especially bad time to put in a bottle. The beach was rather crowded considering that the weather was far from brilliant. It was foggy, but at least wasn’t raining, and there was a yellow alert of heavy rainfall in place. Thus I figured, I’d rather put them in now, than not being able to dispatch them at all. I chose bottle No. 93, one of those with a monoprint on them, and a more recent bottle, No. 96.

Lot of effort that got my trousers completely wet – but bottles went up too high, and landed maybe 5 meters away from me in the water

I am rather poor at throwing, and they just sat there for a long time.

I brought two more bottles with me to the coast, and I kept those two until the next morning. We went to the pier in the morning, and waited for it to be opened. It was 10 minutes after high tide when we went stairs and walked to the end. Maybe an hour later would have been a better time, current-wise. But the water was already retreating, and thus I figured that the chances for them to wash out of the Lincolnshire bay were positive.

Bottles No. 94 and 95 shortly before their dispatch from Skegness Pier on 3/6/18

I went with my son onto the pier, and he insisted on throwing in one bottle himself.

As you can see, he really just flatly dropped it, and while it did land in the water…

we watched it land while we were standing on the pier. So we went down, picked it up, and he gave it another go.

The other bottle which I put in, looked like a promising dispatch:

a close-up:

Right after returning from the pier (the second time) I found this:

Notts Rocks

On the backside of the pebble it said “FB Notts Rocks”. I looked it up in the meantime, and it is a community of people who decorate rocks and pebbles and leave them at places for others to find. – Wonderful, absolutely wonderful! It will have its own special spot in my studio! Thanks to whoever left it there for me!

That’s it from me from the Skegness dispatches. 3 of the 4 bottles were already found by the time I am typing this blogpost. I’ll speak more about the finds, and the bottles (with contents revealed) in the next days. So stay tuned!

Two new bottles and a dispatch into the River Thames

Chelsea Bridge 2

Chelsea Bridge in London, near Battersea Park, image via Wikipedia

I needed a new passport, which I need to apply for in person at the German embassy in London. This was the reason I spend a couple of days in London at the beginning of the week. Of course I wanted to dispatch a bottle into the River Thames.

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Bottles No. 86 and 87 waiting for the dispatch

Now I didn’t have any filled bottles left here. You noticed that it got a bit quieter here in the last months, and that has a couple of reasons. For one I was really busy with other stuff. But also I am a bit frustrated with bottles put into the River Trent (I lived at the shores of the River Rhine before, and that was great for dispatching bottles). So I had to come up with new bottles on the eve of leaving. I made a couple of small prints in the last weeks, and thus wrote a little for a bottle, wound up a print (Nightlion, small), and then had to realise that it was too big for the small bottle. So I put it into a larger bottle, which I already colleted for when I run out of small ones (which honestly doesn’t seem likely to happen soon with the current rate of production). And then, because I really would rather stick to small bottles for now, I filled another bottle with two prints from my women with hats series of prints.

On Tuesday we visited Battersea Park (and the children’s zoo), and then dropped in the bottles from Chelsea Bridge. The bigger one was dropped in by my daughter. M. was really quick with the camera and managed to capture the moment:

Dispatch of Bottle No. 86

And Bottle No. 87 was dropped in by my son. Unfortunately I was slower, and the bottle had already dopped with the shutters opened:

Shortly after Dispatch of Bottle No. 87
In the picture below you can see them both floating down the river. If you click on it, you go to an ipernity page, and there you can choose to “see all sizes” to actually see that the tiny white specks in the middle of the circles are actually bottles.

Messages in Bottles No. 86 and 87 floating down the River Thames
Like always I am hoped for a good travel and happy finders for these bottles.

Dispatch into the North Sea from the “King Seaways”

King seaways IJmuiden, December 2011

King Seaways via Wikimedia Commons

I boarded the King of Seaways on the 29th of December in Ijmuiden (near Amsterdam) to go to North Shields (Newcastle) together with my husband and the twins to go home to Nottingham after our Christmas vacation in Germany. After our dinner on board the children got ready for bed and I dropped two of my bottles into the North Sea. I am not quite sure what time it was, maybe 8pm in the Netherlands. If that is true, then we had been sailing for about 2 or 3 hours at the time, in any case we were still much closer to the Dutch than to the English coast.

These were the last two bottles I still had prepared, carrying the numbers 83 and 75.

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a last look at the bottles, still in the cabin

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stepping out onto the promenade deck

We had our cabin on deck 11 which is rather high above the water. I went down as low as possible on the promanade deck, maybe deck 9, and there at the stern I threw the bottles over the star board, hoping that this way they won’t get struck by the propeller. In the ship’s light I could see one of them floating away, obviously surviving the fall. The other sounded o.k., but I failed to see it. – The attempt to make a photo failed, unfortunately but not unexpectedly.

The following picture was taken the next morning: Somewhere there in the East my bottles float.

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Sunrise seen from the stern of the King Seaways

Now it is time to make new bottles. I have no plans yet, so I am myself looking forward to see how the new series will look like.

 

Last Weekend’s Unusual Dispatch

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Rätselbild: Wo ist das?

Hallo, miteinander! Ich hatte in einem vorherigen Blogpost ja schonmal erzählt, dass ich letztes Wochenende Geburtstag hatte. Und wie angekündigt, hat mich mein lieber Mann auf eine Überraschungsreise eingeladen. Das Bild oben ist in der Garage bei unserem Hotel entstanden. Na, wagt einer einen Tipp wo wir waren? Ich finde ja, es sieht original wie in Hongkong aus (das haben wir vor acht Jahren unsere Hochzeitsreise hin gemacht). Aber wir waren in Manchester. – Das ist auch viel praktischer von Nottingham aus zu erreichen.

Hello everyone! I told you in my last blog post that it – will be, by now was – my birthday last weekend. And as expected, M. took me on a trip. The photo above was made on the parking deck near our hotel. Can you guess where we went? To me it looks so much like Hong Kong (where we spent our honeymoon eight years ago, by the way). But of course it was much nearer: we went to Manchester.

China Town in Manchester

China Town in Manchester

Ich hatte mir zum Geburtstag gewünscht, mal wieder schön Dim Sum essen zu gehen. Hier in Nottingham gibt es zwar hier und da am Wochenende Dim Sum in Restaurants zu bestellen, aber so richtig schön ist es erst in richtigen kantonesischen Restaurants, wo die Kellner mit Wagen zwischen den Tischen hin- und herfahren, und man sich auf den Tisch nimmt, was einem gefällt und was eben so vorbeikommt. Und das gibt es hier leider nicht. – Und so ging die Reise nach Manchester, wo eine größere chinesische Gemeinschaft gibt, und auch die richtige Sorte Restaurant.

I had asked M. for my birthday, to invite me for a real dim sum once again. He got to know and love dim sum restaurants when he lived in Taiwan before we got to know each other. When he later lived in the Minneapolis, USA, he took me to a dim sum place there, in memory of his old times – and I loved it! Since then we went many times whenever was possible, and it it by now mostly me draging him there. Although it is possible in many Chinese restaurants to order dim sum from a menu on Sundays (which we often did), neither Bonn nor Nottingham has one of the cantonese restaurants where they drive the food around on carts and you choose what you want to eat while it is passing by. – And I missed this! Therefore my birthday wish. And so M. took me to China Town in Manchester.

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Kunst in Manchester

We only had little time with two small children on one day in Manchester, and the weather was not really fine, and so we have much more to see and come again. – And I do hope and expect we’ll be back anothe rtime. Manchester seems an exciting city. For example we spotted this metal dragon waiting for something on what seemed like a ruin.

Manchester war überhaupt schön und beeindruckend. Zum Beispiel haben wir im Vorübergehen diesen Metalldrachen lauern sehen. Kinder sind ja von anderen Dingen begeistert als Erwachsene. Unser Sohn fand vor allem die ganzen geschlossenen Ladenfronten in China-Town aufregend, an denen wir vorbei gekommen sind als wir am Samstag Morgen schonmal eine Runde gedreht haben. An jedem Metallrolladen musste er Halt machen, mit den Fingern dagegen klopfen, und feststellen, wie “lustig” das ist. Was daran so amüsant war, haben wir nicht verstanden.

Manchester geschmückt

Manchester geschmückt

Whole Manchester (not just China Town) was decorated because this week in the whole city various things happen in celebration of chinese New Year on Monday. – Very nice!

Weil kommenden Montag chinesisches Neujahrsfest ist, und deshalb an diesem Wochenende in Manchester überall Festlichkeiten stattfinden, war auch letztes Wochenende schon die ganze Stadt (nicht nur China-Town) mit diesen roten chinesischen Laternen geschmückt. – Sehr hübsch!

Dim Sum - Naja, nur leere Bambuskörbe

Dim Sum – Naja, fast nur leere Bambuskörbe

And of course we finally also had dim sum. Unfortunately it was also the weekend of bad photography for me, it seems, and so I don’t have much to show you, I am afraid.

Mein Dim Sum habe ich natürlich auch bekommen. Leider war schlechte-Fotos-Wochenende, so wie’s scheint, und ich habe nicht viel zum Vorzeigen. Aber wir hatten viel Spaß und haben alle so viel gegessen, dass wir fast nicht mehr vom Tisch aufstehen konnten.

Dann war eigentlich Zeit zum Flaschen einwerfen. Ich hatte ja vor, zur Feier des Tages vier Flaschen einzuwerfen. – Und da viel mir auf, dass ich sie in der Hektik des Losfahrens am Freitag Abend vergessen hatte. Oh nein!

And after eating, we were going to go to the city center and dispatch the four bottles that I took with me – oh no! At that moment I realized that I had left them at home. We drove off on Friday evening in a hurry, and I simply forgot to put them in my bag.
There was nothing I could do about that now, of course. But I didn’t want to leave the city without leaving a bottle. And so I bought some lemonade in a glass bottle with a tin screw-on top and prepared the bottle in our hotel room:

Flaschenpost

ein unschmeichelhaftes Bild von mir mit Flaschenpost

Weil ich so ganz ohne Flaschenpost abschicken dann aber doch nicht wieder nach Hause wollte, habe ich also in einem Supermarkt eine Limonade in Glasflasche mit Schraubverschluss gekauft, ausgetrunken, Etikett abgelöst und nach einen Brief geschrieben. Mein Sohn hat auch was gekritzelt, denn er wollte unbedingt mitmachen. Und dann habe ich noch zwei Bilder aus meinem Skizzenbuch, das ich dabei hatte mit reingelegt, und zugeschraubt.

I put in a letter (of course), and added two pictures from my sketchbook that I carried with me. My son added a letter of his own, because he wanted to be part of this, too.
The next day, we went to the River Irwell, which conveniently flows through the centre of the city, and dispatched the bottle from bridge road. Unfortuantely all photos of the event are blurry so that I have nothing more to show you. But then, you probably know by now how it looks like when I put a bottle in to a river.

Flaschenpost

Flaschenpost

Am nächsten Tag habe ich sie dann direkt vor der Abfahrt in den River Irwell geworfen, stilecht von der “Bridge Street” aus. – Leider sind die Fotos auch alle verwackelt und unscharf. Aber naja, ihr wisst ja mittlerweile, wie es aussieht, wenn ich eine Flasche in einen Fluss werfe.

Nun ist eine Woche ins Land gegangen, und ich habe noch nichts gehört. Da die Flasche nur ihren Metallverschluss hatte, bin ich pessimistisch. Aber man kann ja nie wissen. Also dann “Weiter Gute Reise!” wieder ungewöhnlichen Flasche, die deshalb auch keine Nummer in meinem Projekt bekommen hat.

Because this bottle is so different, I didn’t give it a number in this project. It has been a week now, and I have not heard anything. I must admit I am a little bit pessimistic about this bottle. But you never know, and so I wish it another “Farewell and happy finders!”

Christmas Dispatches

Pride-of-Rotterdam

The Pride of Rotterdam, Foto By Stefan Scheer [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

Like the past two years I spent the Christmas Holidays in Germany, visiting family. And, just like the past years, I brought messages in bottles with me. The first bottle, No. 73, was tossed into a black North Sea in the small hours in the morning from board the Pride of Rotterdam, about an hour before we reached the harbour in Rotterdam.

Wie auch die letzten beiden Jahre habe ich die Weihnachtsferien in Deutschland verbracht. Und, ebenfalls wie in den letzten Jahren auch, habe ich die Gelegenheit genutzt, ein paar Flaschen abzuwerfen. Die erste Flasche trägt die Nummer 73 und den Titel “die Biene”. Ich habe sie in den Morgenstunden vom so genannten Sonnendeck der “Pride of Rotterdam” geworfen, etwa eine Stunde bevor wir in den Hafen in Rotterdam eingelaufen sind.

Es war noch absolut dunkel, kalt und windig draußen. Ich habe noch einen kurzen Blick erhaschen können, und bin sicher, dass die Flasche nicht beim Aufprall aufs Wasser zerschollen oder in unsere eigene Schraube geraten ist. Aber innerhalb von Sekunden wurde sie von der Dunkelheit verschluckt. Das letzte Bild, das ich von ihr habe, ist noch in unserer Kabine entstanden:

It was surprisingly windy on the so called sundeck, although we had had a very steady ride. I was still dark, but I was able to see that the bottle hit the water without taking apparent damage. But we swiftly left it behind, and it was swallowed up in the darkness in seconds. This is the last photo I took of it, still in our cabin:

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Last photo of bottle no. 73 “The Bee” on board the Pride of Rotterdam

The second bottle was dispatched in to the River Ems in Telgte the day before Christmas Eve. The Ems splits into a main and a side arm in Telgte and both rejoin just a little North of the city center, behind the monumental church (well, monumental, given the size of the city). The main arm is slowed down with a weir there, which is where I threw last year’s bottle in. This year we went 10m further down the road and my son put bottle No. 76 “the star” into the smaller side arm there.

Die zweite Flasche, Nummer 76, habe ich am 23. Dezember in Telgte in die Ems geworfen. Naja, eigentlich nicht ich selbst, sondern mein Sohn. Er steht hier und schaut flussaufwärts, seine Schwester schaut in die andere Richtung und hält Ausschau nach der Post. Bis er und ich auf der anderen Brückenseite ware (eigentlich nicht weit), und ich die Kamera für ein letztes Foto bereit hatte, war die Flasche schon davon geschwommen. – Die Ems war recht voll und erstaunlich schnell an dem Tag.

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my son, facing upstream and putting in the message in bottle, my daughter (his twin sister) stood on the other side of the bridge facing downstream watching the bottle

Below you can see how the river looks like there. The water was high and quick, and when I had turned down and tried to make a picture of the floating bottle, I had already lost sight. Maybe one of you can spot it in the photo? I definitely can’t not even when looking at it in full resolution.

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view of the sidearm of the Ems in the city centre of Telgte

In Telgte teilt sich die Ems und fließt gerade durch die Stadt als ein Haupt- und ein Nebenarm, die sich kurz unterhalb des letzten Wehrs in Telgte wieder vereinen. Letztes Jahr habe ich in den Hauptarm geworfen, diesmal haben wir uns für den Seitenarm entschieden.Man kann die Stelle auf dem Foto oben beinahe erahnen. – Aber wahrscheinlich nur, wenn man den Fluss da kennt.Ich wünsche beiden Flaschen glückliche Finder!

I hope both bottles will meet kind and happy finders!